Smoked Plantain Chips

Smokey-Plantains

I love plantain chips when I am looking for something crunchy to snack on. I love the flavor. Sprinkled with a little salt – it’s the perfect treat.

It never occurred to me to make my own though. Whenever I pick up some green plantains in the market, I tend to stick with tostones or use them in a hash. I’ve always relied on the bagged chips though. Not sure why – especially now that I know how easy they are to make.

What I don’t like about the bagged variety are the additives. Way too much oil and sometimes other preservatives might be added to the mix. Plantains are a fairly healthy starch and when prepared properly, are not so bad for you!

plantains

So I made my own. And since I couldn’t just be all simple, I needed to spice it up. I chose to go the smokey route. I added some smoked paprika, garlic and salt. So easy! Tossed it all on some olive oil. Laid it on a baking sheet and then baked it for about 30 minutes or so, flipping over once. How easy can it get?

I let them cool about a minute before munching on them. They were so good. I’ve definitely given up my bagged plantain chip habit. These are so much better!



Smoked Plantain Chips
 
Author:

Ingredients
  • 3 Green Plantains
  • 1.5 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1.5 tbsp. smoked paprika
  • sea salt
  • ½ tbsp. garlic powder

Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350
  2. Peel the plantains (use the linked how-to guide)
  3. Slice the plantains thinly on a diagonal
  4. In a large bowl, toss the plantains with the oil and spices
  5. Lay the plantain chips in a single layer on a baking sheet
  6. Bake in the oven for about 30 minutes, until crisp. Flip the chips half-way through the baking process and check on them toward the end to ensure that they aren’t burning.
  7. Cool for a few minutes before eating.
  8. Enjoy!

smoked-plantain-chips.jpg

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KIND Healthy Grain Bars

Disclosure: I got this product as part of an advertorial.

oats-and-honey-kind

I was recently sent a box of KIND bars to check out. They came out with a new line of granola bars. You may already be familiar with their fruit and nut bars. I really enjoy them, so I was excited to see what they had in store.

They sent me a variety of flavors to try. Now available are:

  • Dark Chocolate Chunk
  • Peanut Butter Dark Chocolate
  • Vanilla Blueberry
  • Maple Pumpkin Seeds with Sea Salt
  • Oats & Honey with Toasted Coconut

When I opened the box, I zeroed in on the two bars that included chocolate. I mean, who doesn’t love a chocolate chip granola bar?

Since the fine folks at KIND gave me two of each bar to try, I brought some of the extras to work so my buddies could sample and give their opinion as well. They were gobbled up super fast. The KIND logo on the wrapping is already a seal of approval for many, as the brand is known offer good quality. These bars didn’t disappoint.

I thought my favorite would be the dark chocolate chunk flavor, but it turned out to be the oats & honey variety with the coconut. I did love all of them though and will definitely buy them again. I think I like them more than their line of nut bars.

You can learn more about KIND bars and where to buy them by visiting their website.

I received one or more of the products mentioned above for free using Tomoson.com. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers.

Fermented Radishes

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Fermented Radishes

I’ve recently been studying up more on fermentation. I am learning all about the benefits of fermented foods in my diet. I’ve made kimchi in the past, and enjoyed it, but I didn’t really realize how good it is for you! I started to delve more in to fermentation when I ended up with excess vegetables in my CSA. I didn’t want to risk wasting vegetables that I may not use, so I looked for ways to prolong their life.

I considered canning my vegetables, but I don’t have the patience to deal with the whole jar sterilization and cooking process. Maybe one day.

I learned that fermentation can be very easy, and doesn’t require as many tools as canning. It’s also far less precise than the canning process.

I then learned about the health benefits . Fermented foods are said to aid in digestion, creating a natural probiotic that helps balance your gut. As food ferments, the foods becomes enriched with good enzymes and vitamins. I kept reading, and as I did, I knew I had to give it a try.

I began my summer ferments with some radishes. I had a large amount of beautiful organic radishes from my co-op share and I knew that they wouldn’t all get eaten in salads. I decided that I’d ferment them using a simple 2%  brine base.

Fermented Radishes

I began by cleaning and trimming these beautiful radishes. Then, I sliced them thinly.

sliced-radishes

I washed my jars well and packed the jars with garlic, dill, my sliced radishes and some peppercorns. I then added some of the liquid brine and  sealed the Bell jars and set them aside in a warm, dark corner.

radishes-in-jars

I checked on them every few days to see how they tasted and to make sure that the radishes were still under the liquid brine, pressing them down if they began to pop out.

I kept them in my dark corner of the counter for 2 weeks, at which time, I determined by tasting them, that the radishes were ready and then placed them in my fridge.

They were done and ready to be used. I highly recommend this simple ferment if you are a beginner at fermenting.

Fermented Radishes

Fermented Radishes
 
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish, Pickles

Ingredients
  • 2 bunches of radishes
  • ½ cup fresh dill
  • 6-8 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp. peppercorns
  • 4 cups filtered water
  • 2¾ tbsp sea salt

Instructions
  1. Heat up the water in a pot and add the salt. Let the salt dissolve.
  2. Remove water from heat and let cool completely.
  3. Wash, trim and slice radishes thinly.
  4. Pack the radish slices along with the garlic and dill in to the glass jars. There should be a 1-inch clearance between the tops of the radishes and the lid.
  5. Pour the brine over the radish mixture so that the liquid covers the radishes
  6. Some people like to add a weight or a cabbage leaf on top to ensure that the radishes are completed submerged in the brine mixture. You will have some brine leftover.
  7. Seal the lids tightly.
  8. Place jars in a warm and dark space for up to 2 weeks.
  9. Check on the jars ever 1-2 days, burping the jars and resealing them. This is also the time where you take a taste and see if the radish pickles are sour enough.
  10. When the radishes have reached the desired sourness, move the jars to the fridge.
  11. Enjoy!

 

 

 

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